Exchange

Announcing the first AEP professional development course

The Artists’ Exchange Programme (AEP) initiated by Danielle Teale Dance, announces the first two-day AEP professional skills course offered to students from University of Roehampton.

The AEP is an example of innovative, artist-led leadership; a CPD initiative focused on artistry and high quality choreographic practice in community dance. The programme offers a range of opportunities from Artists' Skills Exchange for mid-career Artists , to bespoke Masterclasses or Professional Development courses suitable for a range of participants.

The AEP interrogates practice which falls within the intersection between professional, choreographic and community dance and asks questions of these labels, giving us the chance to exchange ideas, reflect and analyse our practice for the future benefit of the participants we work with.

One of the most enriching experiences I have had as an artist. I have never before been in a CPD environment where there has been so much depth and intricacy in our explorations
— Rachel Fullegar, AEP Skills Exchange, participating artist Dec 2017

The upcoming two-day artistic development course is aimed at early career students of University of Roehampton, and will be led by Danielle Teale with excellent guest artist contributors from across the UK. The course is suitable for those looking for guidance and inspiration for their career development, and to build a network of support.

The two-day course will take place at University of Roehampton, 6-7 June.

Go to the join in page for more information or contact Danielle Teale.

Empathy, awareness, human experience

Skills Exchange Day 3

20 Questions

Tom Hobden

_MG_6928LR.jpg

Tom Hobden is a choreographer, teacher, dance education consultant, mentor and co-artistic director of UNIT which he co-founded in 2014 with film director Kate Flurrie. The company produces three strands of work including touring productions and projects involving participatory casts, stand alone films presented in film festivals across Europe and creative learning projects and consultancy for young dancers, graduates, and dance organisations. Tom is regarded as a leader in community dance practice and most known for his intergenerational performances and long-standing work with boys in dance. Tom was an Associate Artist of DanceEast from 2014-17.  

 

 

Tom Hobden led the Skills Exchange artists through a creative process to highlight the principles behind his practice and what led him to the development of his current work '20 Questions'. 20 Questions is an intergenerational piece developed with local people with varying experience of dance. Every performer in the show goes on a process with Tom and co-director Kate Flurrie; learning who they are, who they were and who they might like to be; finding the answers to these big questions through movement. 

 

The workshop led by Tom began with an improvisation which opened us up to our internal and external perception and awareness - first taking in the room and everything in your immediate environment; then bringing attention to yourself, your feelings, how you travel, your state of alertness. Lasty we directed our attention to each other - to really see each other, look in each others eyes and connect. The workshop is designed to draw your attention to the choices you make when moving, give you the autonomy to make better choices or different choices, to break rules, find new possibilities and shift your habits.

The whole process for the improvisation is to learn about others, build empathy physically and emotionally. How do they move? What moves them to move? I observe where confidence comes in movement choices and try to enhance this. I challenge habits and encourage them to freely move. I let myself go as a teacher to set the example and enjoy the sensation of moving to show the joy in moving to others. The process takes as long as they feel comfortable in letting themselves go and to start to introduce play and joy.
— Tom Hobden

20 questions process: 

Tom then led us through the choreographic process of his piece 20 Questions.

  • In partners ask one question ‘ how would your friends describe you?’ 
  • One partner will listen; we build a strong human connection through the sharing of relatable experience
  • One partner listens for clues that will help them to make a a short movement solo. They listen for character, movement in their lives, clues that might help build a movement task
  • It is the responsibility of both partners to make the movement, but it must capture something of the person. I ask the partner to consider if they were making a dance portrait what elements must be included (would it be fast, slow, gestural, large movement)
  • Once the movement has been made it is the responsibility of both to move as freely/expressively as they can. The observer is looking for the person to be themselves. The solo should be totally fresh, playful and always with room to change. The pair can work together to made adaptations which enable more of the person to show through
_MG_7254LR.jpg
The process evolved from my desire to work with anybody. I always wanted to capture something beautiful in every person. The process is purposefully quick to try and let people be themselves without too much rehearsal. I fundamentally believe that all movement created is beautiful and that anything created is valid as long as the individual feels it truly expresses them.
— Tom Hobden

Questions and considerations arising from this exploration included:

  • Drawing from real human experience. How does this process stay motivational and positive for the participant? How does the artist protect his or herself from the intensity of the emotional sharing?
  • Asking questions. Choreographic process applied to the questions to ensure they are layered effectively and ordered in such a way that supports the dancer.
  • Using gesture to represent feelings and experiences. Mime to abstraction. Turning the ordinary into the extraordinary.
  • Building empathy and supportiveness quickly for people involves being wholehearted and vulnerable yourself. Your ability to be responsive involves resilience.

Ensemble and Collectivity

Skills Exchange Day 3

Group, individual, autonomy and leadership

On Skills Exchange Day 3, Hannah and Danielle collaborated to deliver a workshop exploring their joint interest of collectivity and ensemble from very different perspectives. 

Hannah shared her thoughts on the ensemble as a uniting concept in which dancers communicate through shared action. Questions and thoughts arising from Hannah's workshop included:

  • The concept of knowing your role within a group and feeling a sense of achievement from the defined boundaries that are established
  • The rhythmic nature of moving as a tribe and how this unites us in our breath and action. The power of the collective
  • The natural hierarchy of our senses - exploring how we tune in to each other through sight and sound and then finding ways to tune in without using our primary - exploring ways to tune in to one another through style of movement, touch
  • How do we make decisions as a collective without a leader? What influences us? What makes us move? What makes us stop? How can we make the boundaries between us clearer in order to be a truly non hierarchic collective? (links to the notion of our role as an artist and ways to blur the lines between artist and dancer in order to break down the structures of power - see the role of the artist)
IMG_6812LR.jpg

Hannah's workshop tasks highlighted these concepts and left us questioning: 

  • How aware are we of the space? Of each other? Of our options?
  • When we facilitate ‘ensemble working’, how are decisions made? Who’s voice is heard? What are our frustrations with the process? What limits us?

These concepts encouraged us to question how we give autonomy to participants working as a collective when there is one overall leader; which leads us to the theme of my recent research Collectivity and Intimacy.

In my workshop I shared the working processed behind my research with people with Parkinson's. The Collectivity and Intimacy project was developed out of a curiosity for the teaching method of collectivity which is used in dance for Parkinson's to make best use of mirror neurons and external cueing, which is a highly researched and a proven tool for supporting people with Parkinson's to move with more fluidity and intention.

My research interrogates this teaching practice and questions whether it can be considered inclusive, as it is led by external direction (either visual, auditory, verbal or tactile) by the artist. In the process of researching I have worked with dancers with Parkinson's to experiment with handing over the autonomy to the dancers and how we go about this. I am interested in how we could embed tools for internal cueing within our artistic teaching practice. Some of the tools I experimented with included somatic, mind-body imagery; guided visual imagery; breath; interpretation of words. All of these stimuli were used to encourage freedom of interpretation in the body.

IMG_6959LR.jpg

The discussion occurring from this session included

  • Blurring lines between artistic practice and therapy - how do we ensure that we are providing an artistic experience which is inspired by ideas and concepts, rather than developing content which is responsive to need and disability
  • What is the value of dance designed FOR..? Is this a different form of inclusive dance, made accessible to a particular demographic due to highly streamlined and meticulously constructed methodology, rather than due to its open access and inclusive approach to all people?
  • How are we inclusive when working with collective or Ensemble style approaches to dance
  • How do we find a balance between directive approaches to delivery versus democratic leadership in artistic and teaching practice? Where do we place the most value?
  • There is a power in collective initiation of movement, change or action
  • There is a power in self determined initiation of movement, change or action
  • Refreshing and updating our approaches to these two contrasting states can enable participants to continue to experience the power of both

Where it started...

As I excitedly prepare for the first day of the AEP Skills Exchange beginning tomorrow, I thought I would kick off by sharing the journey that I have been which led me to develop this programme.

Starting with my practice as a community dance artist and continuing with my academic research in community practice, I've always been interested in how we discover and foster equality and co-ownership in dance settings. Through an inquiry drawing on evidence from multiple community dance contexts from integrated projects to older people dancing, to youth dance and dance in hospitals, I summarised that it is in an artistic setting rather than a pedagogic one; in a relationship of artists and dancers, rather than participants and teachers; that co-ownership of dancing experience is possible.

However, this theory was only the start of my continued interest in co-ownership as I finished my MA but continually found myself considering the notion of artists and dancers, and how it is that some dance artists situate themselves in the role of artist, and others find it difficult to envisage themselves with that title. If so many dance artists working in community dance have not had the opportunity to position themselves in their own minds as artists, and instead are working with pedagogic frameworks and principles but without a creative vision or message, the experience for the dancers they work with is less likely to reach a place of equality and co-ownership, which are concepts at the heart of community dance.

And so, the Artists' Exchange Programme began informally with Artists' Conversations. I spoke one-to-one with a handful of dance artists whose practice sits in the valley between two mountains - community and choreography. Two things that are indistinguishable in my opinion, but which seem to be becoming further and further removed. These artists believe that their work emerges from a close connection with the community dancers they engage with, but firmly delivers an artistic vision or intention that is their own. I was keen to discover what the artists shared, what they had in common - whether it be their values, practices or challenges - and what I found was that it was all three. These artists had a common belief in people, play, joy and communication; they had all considered the multi-faceted roles they hold as directors, choreographers, mentors and teachers; they were all feeling the challenge of building resilience, expressing their value as individuals, and positioning their work in an industry with existing hierarchic structures that they all aspire to break down...

What I began to understand was that the things that all these artists shared were vital to the success of their work. Their ability to create true co-ownership and foster equality in their work, stemmed from their artistic vision, their ability to communicate it, and their belief that all people could access it. The AEP Skills' Exchange this week brings together artists with this vision, experience and with something to say, so that they can share in the values, beliefs and ambitions of one another, and understand the power of the collective when you have a message to deliver. As part of the week's exploration, they will contribute to a body of knowledge that Danielle Teale Dance will take forward to develop the AEP Professional Development workshops, enabling further community dance artists to access peer learning and tailored support to develop their artistic practice. This further development of the AEP workshops is supported by Yorkshire Dance, DanceEast and Theatre Bristol, in order to bring tailored professional development to regional artists.

Please follow the content on the Artists' Conversations Blog to find out what we are sharing, discussing and exploring throughout this week.

Launching the Artists' Exchange Programme

Launching the Artists' Exchange Programme

Danielle Teale Dance launches the Artist Exchange Programme (AEP) funded by Arts Council England

Danielle Teale Dance is delighted to announce the launch of the Artists Exchange Programme, an initiative that focuses on artistry in the continuing professional development of artists working in community dance.