Empathy, awareness, human experience

Skills Exchange Day 3

20 Questions

Tom Hobden

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Tom Hobden is a choreographer, teacher, dance education consultant, mentor and co-artistic director of UNIT which he co-founded in 2014 with film director Kate Flurrie. The company produces three strands of work including touring productions and projects involving participatory casts, stand alone films presented in film festivals across Europe and creative learning projects and consultancy for young dancers, graduates, and dance organisations. Tom is regarded as a leader in community dance practice and most known for his intergenerational performances and long-standing work with boys in dance. Tom was an Associate Artist of DanceEast from 2014-17.  

 

 

Tom Hobden led the Skills Exchange artists through a creative process to highlight the principles behind his practice and what led him to the development of his current work '20 Questions'. 20 Questions is an intergenerational piece developed with local people with varying experience of dance. Every performer in the show goes on a process with Tom and co-director Kate Flurrie; learning who they are, who they were and who they might like to be; finding the answers to these big questions through movement. 

 

The workshop led by Tom began with an improvisation which opened us up to our internal and external perception and awareness - first taking in the room and everything in your immediate environment; then bringing attention to yourself, your feelings, how you travel, your state of alertness. Lasty we directed our attention to each other - to really see each other, look in each others eyes and connect. The workshop is designed to draw your attention to the choices you make when moving, give you the autonomy to make better choices or different choices, to break rules, find new possibilities and shift your habits.

The whole process for the improvisation is to learn about others, build empathy physically and emotionally. How do they move? What moves them to move? I observe where confidence comes in movement choices and try to enhance this. I challenge habits and encourage them to freely move. I let myself go as a teacher to set the example and enjoy the sensation of moving to show the joy in moving to others. The process takes as long as they feel comfortable in letting themselves go and to start to introduce play and joy.
— Tom Hobden

20 questions process: 

Tom then led us through the choreographic process of his piece 20 Questions.

  • In partners ask one question ‘ how would your friends describe you?’ 
  • One partner will listen; we build a strong human connection through the sharing of relatable experience
  • One partner listens for clues that will help them to make a a short movement solo. They listen for character, movement in their lives, clues that might help build a movement task
  • It is the responsibility of both partners to make the movement, but it must capture something of the person. I ask the partner to consider if they were making a dance portrait what elements must be included (would it be fast, slow, gestural, large movement)
  • Once the movement has been made it is the responsibility of both to move as freely/expressively as they can. The observer is looking for the person to be themselves. The solo should be totally fresh, playful and always with room to change. The pair can work together to made adaptations which enable more of the person to show through
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The process evolved from my desire to work with anybody. I always wanted to capture something beautiful in every person. The process is purposefully quick to try and let people be themselves without too much rehearsal. I fundamentally believe that all movement created is beautiful and that anything created is valid as long as the individual feels it truly expresses them.
— Tom Hobden

Questions and considerations arising from this exploration included:

  • Drawing from real human experience. How does this process stay motivational and positive for the participant? How does the artist protect his or herself from the intensity of the emotional sharing?
  • Asking questions. Choreographic process applied to the questions to ensure they are layered effectively and ordered in such a way that supports the dancer.
  • Using gesture to represent feelings and experiences. Mime to abstraction. Turning the ordinary into the extraordinary.
  • Building empathy and supportiveness quickly for people involves being wholehearted and vulnerable yourself. Your ability to be responsive involves resilience.